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Is this a way to stop Parkinson’s tremors? Inventor is convinced her creation can help thousands

Casual observers can overlook a small twig of wire hooked on Sandra McDonough’s left ear.

However, she claims that this seemingly harmless little homemade stick gave her the speech and maneuverability she lost shortly before her 40th birthday after being diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease in 2002.

Sandra’s once busy and vibrant world, unable to speak, walk, drive, or even stabilize her feet without stuttering, has been destroyed by illness.

Still 20 years later, after two years of intensive effort to develop the technology on his own, Sandra finds her creation, called the Eyeguide MC, helping thousands of people like her suffering from an incurable illness. I’m sure I can.

“My tremors are gone, my speech isn’t blunted, it’s balanced. It’s all that has been a pain in my life,” said Sandra, 59, a former payroll clerk. increase.

Sandra’s once busy and vibrant world, unable to speak, walk, drive, or even stay stable on her feet without stuttering, was destroyed by illness.

She claims that her tremor disappears within seconds of wearing the device.

The theory behind the Eye Guide MC is as simple as its appearance. It resembles a billopen, one end attached to a hearing aid-style gadget worn on the ear, and the other end the peripheral vision (a part of our field of vision that moves our eyes and head. Then the eyes can only see the tip.

This allows Sandra to pick up new signals from her eyes that stimulate the basal ganglia, which is the part of the brain that controls movement.

But can a small wire without a plug or battery and no clinical trial data to back it up really have a life-changing impact on this truly debilitating illness?

Parkinson’s disease affects 145,000 people in the United Kingdom alone, and the number of cases is increasing due to our longevity.

For mysterious reasons (as with the family history of the disease, aging seems to be a risk factor), nerve cells called neurons in the basal ganglia are damaged or dead, and levels of a chemical in the brain called dopamine It develops when it declines — essential for controlling body movements.

This leads to very severe tremors, and patients often have difficulty performing simple tasks such as holding a cup. Also, “freezing” may occur. This is temporary and involuntary, making your feet feel like they are glued to the floor.

The theory behind the Eye Guide MC is as simple as its appearance.It resembles a vilopen, one end attached to a hearing aid-style gadget worn on the ear, the other end is peripheral vision (part of our field of vision, moving the eyes and head), eyes. Makes you look only at the tip

The theory behind the Eye Guide MC is as simple as its appearance.It resembles a vilopen, one end attached to a hearing aid-style gadget worn on the ear, the other end is peripheral vision (part of our field of vision, moving the eyes and head), eyes. Makes you look only at the tip

Sandra and Chris have patented the device and discovered that a local manufacturer manufactures it from her prototype and from stainless steel and recycled plastic.Currently priced at £ 995

Sandra and Chris have patented the device and discovered that a local manufacturer manufactures it from her prototype and from stainless steel and recycled plastic.Currently priced at £ 995

Currently, there is no cure for Parkinson’s disease, and patients are taking medication to stop the tremors, stiffness, and speech problems it causes.

Sandra first developed tremors in her right hand and toes in 2001.

However, the neurologist she was referred to suspected it was Parkinson’s disease because she was still quite young (only 38 years old) and instead blamed anxiety.

Only after her symptoms worsened in the next 12 months was she finally confirmed to have Parkinson’s disease.

Sandra, who lives with her husband Chris, 65, in Spalding, Lincolnshire, said:

“Finally, I knew what was causing me so many problems, but on the other hand, I had an incurable, progressive illness that could deprive me of all my independence. So the outlook was terrible. “

She was prescribed a drug called Sinemet that raises dopamine levels.

It worked for several years, allowing Sandra to talk and walk normally. But then her symptoms began to worsen — for some patients, the effects of the drug disappeared after a few years.

Sandra says:’Every day was hard. It was so hard to walk straight that I ended up with a wheelchair that developed what was called a Parkinson’s shuffle.

“Chris and I used to live a very lively life. We were members of the bike club and loved going out.

“And he did great and did what he could, but I had a hard time physically and mentally. There were days when I couldn’t speak and had to write down everything.”

But then there was a breakthrough. One day, when Sandra messed with a small knitting marker (used to mark the end of a row of knitting), she clipped it to her glasses for convenience — and soon her arm quiver subsided. I noticed that.

“I started wondering if I could change the message to my brain just by putting something in my peripheral vision,” she says.

“I always enjoyed inventing things — I made a weighted brace for my arm to try to control the tremors, so I tweaked the wires and weights a bit and left the side of the glasses. I started putting it in.

“When I had a wire of a certain weight-it had a wire in a certain place with my eyes-it calmed the tremors and helped my speech.

“It took me two years to get it right, but I felt better because I didn’t have the medicine, so I had nothing to lose.”

Sandra and Chris have patented the device and discovered that a local manufacturer manufactures it from her prototype and from stainless steel and recycled plastic. It currently sells for £ 995.

This is just one example of the various devices sold to improve the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, David, a professor of neuropharmacology at Imperial College London and a British science director for the charity Parkinson’s disease. Dexter says.

For example, some shoes shine a laser beam on the floor to provide a visual signal for patients with Parkinson’s disease to continue walking when they are “frozen” and unable to move spontaneously.

So far, more than 100 people have purchased EyeGuide MC after being evaluated by Sandra. Sandra says she doesn't need a team of medical professionals to determine if she's a patient after wearing the device for four years and visiting a neurologist for 20 years.I need a gadget

So far, more than 100 people have purchased EyeGuide MC after being evaluated by Sandra. Sandra says she doesn’t need a team of medical professionals to determine if she’s a patient after wearing the device for four years and visiting a neurologist for 20 years.I need a gadget

“But the fundamental question is whether it is clinically robust,” says Professor Dexter.

“The EyeGuide MC seems to be a simple device, but there is little explanation of how it can help connect to the basal ganglia.

“How does something in the peripheral vision help control tremors?

“If anything, this is peripheral vision, and one of the biggest problems in the late stages of Parkinson’s disease is maintaining balance, so this can actually be distracting.”

He adds: ‘It can also exacerbate the very common hallucinations in the late stages of Parkinson’s disease.

“But in a carefully monitored situation, it doesn’t hurt to try it.”

Parkinson’s UK provided Eye Guide MC with early-stage support for the patenting process and CE safety mark approval, but has not recommended the product as it was not the subject of successful clinical trials.

In addition, he states that no papers have been published to show that peripheral vision devices work.

However, after being evaluated by Sandra, more than 100 people have purchased EyeGuide MC so far. Sandra states that after four years of wearing the device and 20 years of visiting a neurologist, the team’s medical professionals do not need to make a decision. The patient needs a gadget.

She says the cost reflects not only the manufacturing process, but also the overhead of running a clinic to test people.

After funding was secured, a clinical trial at Lincoln University was recently approved.

Meanwhile, Sandra is determined to try to help more patients while the quest for better medicines continues.

She states: “I haven’t cured Parkinson’s disease, but I’ve created a way to control it. A way to regain the independence we desperately want.”

A topper that turbocharges a healthy salad

Nourish your salad with a ready-made “topper”. Ruskander, a nutritionist at Fleet Street Clinic in London, chooses the best four (we tasted them).

GOOD 4 U CAESAR CRUMBLES

150g, £ 2, tesco.com

Per 100g: Calories, 409; Saturated Fat, 1.7g; Protein, 23g; Fiber, 12g; Sugar, 1.7g; Salt, 0.9g

It is made by mixing roasted broad beans with Caesar-flavored seasonings made from kelp, yeast extract, lemon juice and dried mushrooms.

Thanks to beans, you can get just over a tenth of your daily fiber with 7g of muscle-building protein (slightly more than a boiled egg) and the recommended 30g serving.

It also provides a useful amount of vitamin D, plus 42% of the recommended daily dietary intake standard (RDA) for iodine (used to produce the key thyroid hormones of metabolism).

Taste: A clean citrus flavor.

PIMP-MY-SALAD SEA SUPERFOODS

110g, £ 4.99, hollandandbarrett.com

Per 100g: Calories, 420; Saturated Fat, 3g; Protein, 22.6g; Fiber, 9.8g; Sugar, 3.6g; Salt, 0.64g

This is a dried mix of sprouted sunflower seeds and sea vegetables seasoned with wasabi, tamari soy sauce and umezu.

High sunflower seed content is a useful source of heart-healthy unsaturated fats, vitamin E, and various minerals.

The recommended 2 teaspoons of serving add a small but valuable amount of nutrients to your diet.

Taste: Sweet with the scent of vinegar.

LINWOODS Multi Boost Milled Hemp Seed with Mixed Nuts

200g, £ 4.99, linwoodshealthfoods.com

Per 100g: Calories, 496; Saturated Fat, 4.1g; Protein, 26g; Fiber, 24g; Sugar, 2.1g; Salt, 0.05g

Cannabis seeds are an excellent source of fiber, omega 3 and omega 6 (for heart health) — and a recommended portion of 25g provides 16 percent of your daily vitamin E.

This cashew nut and almond adds minerals such as copper (33% of RDA) needed for the formation of red blood cells.

Taste: Mild and nutty.

MUNCHY SEEDS SPICY PERI PERI

125g, £ 2.50, ocado.com

Per 100g: Calories, 508; Saturated Fat, 5.5g; Protein, 20g; Fiber, 8.2g; Sugar, 1.8g; Salt, 1.6g

This is a mixture of seven seeds of quinoa and millet. Various botanical ingredients are good for intestinal health.

This mix also contains useful minerals. The 25g portion is 23% of daily vitamin B1 (important for cell growth and function), 19% of phosphorus RDA (for strong bones), 11% of daily iron requirements, plus 5g of protein. Provide.

It’s high in calories, but it has a strong flavor, so it’s a little more effective.

Taste: A seed crunch with fiery spices.

Mandy Francis

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